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Author Archives: Hannah

About Hannah

Hi! my name is Hannah :)

Life

Life is so strange
Nothing stays the same
Everything change
But who is to blame

Life is like a game
Where you have to lose
Before you can gain
To win you have to face the fearful rain

In Life.. They always say
Don’t use your heart
Only use your brain

The closest people you need go away
When you need them the most
You find them lost

Day after day
Days go by
People are born… and others die

Year after year
No one understands
Nothing is clear
Nothing in our hearts except fear

Today you walk & talk
Tomorrow you lay in your grave
And nothing it gave
The money that you save
And no use of your gold
When it won’t be sold

You have to be strong
Stop doing the wrong
And never lie
Be ready for your last goodbye

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2012 in Action

 

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“I Can’t Help You!”

The sea was raging, its’ merciless waves revenging at the ship that was hopelessly caught in them. It was the perfect night for being in a submarine, under the deadly waves. “Captain, what if that ship see’s us, we will be put in jail” said Jack Breechwick, a lad of nineteen, who had just signed up to go onto the submarine “Blue Marina“, less than two weeks ago. “I dunno, Breechwick” replied the captain, who was fretting over being seen by the ship that was only a good ten meters away from the submarine.

Jack tried to right in his journal to get his mind of the things at present. He wrote: Today is the 15th of April, 1912.  I am beginning to wonder if I should have left my home country (England) to come on this daring submarine sea voyage. I am not exactly to sure were exactly we are, but there are hundreds of ice burgs, and we have nearly had a close colision more than once. I thought England was cold, but this puts England to utter shame!–

“That ship is sinking! THAT SHIP IS SINKING” yelled Jim Bonher, ”Bonher! You can’t be serious! How do you know?!” Jack yelled back “They–they are firing distress signals–and–and I can see the first windows of the bottom deck!” Bonher trembled “Captain! CAPTAIN!” Jack called “Yes Breechwick, what is it?” asked the captain, somewhat annoyed “That ship is sinking, captain, we have to help them!” said Jack “NO ONE gets out of this submarine without my permission, that is final” said the captain, turning to leave, but Jim grabbed him “Captain, we have to help those fellow souls, the Bible says so!” “Bonher, we are in the North Pacific without permission, you know the consequences, prison, maybe being hanged!” said the captain “You can never put a price on a human soul, sir.” Replied Jim firmly “Well then, son of a saint, you may get out of this submarine and go and die with the rest” said the captain angrily, stomping off to his cabin. “I can’t help you! I CAN’T HELP YOU!” slatted* Bonher, leaning against the submarine barrier, “Oh yes we can!” said Jack, “Breechwick, we will never do it without proper life jackets and boats! Besides, I have a wife and three children at home, if I die, who will look after them?” Jim was missing the point “We will help them” Jack said.

As they approached the exit of the submarine, the screaming of the helpless women and children, the staff blowing whistles, the distress signal pistols being fired, got louder and louder…….

Jack cautiously sneaked into the the helm, the part of the suubmarine that had the lives of sixteen men dependant on it. The foolish helmsman was asleep (as it was after mid night), and Jack was able to get into steering position without much russelage. Sharply, quickly, he pulled the submarine geer-steerer to its left and pressed the bright red ‘DECEND‘ button, which would ultimatly ge him into a lot of trouble if or when caught doing this.

Everyone in the boat felt the joulst upwards, it was violent enough to wake the helmsman. As soon as he had administered his job upon the helm, Jack had ran from the room during the decendance almost to fast for the helmsman to notice who it was. But he did. The ship hit verge just as soon as Jack had met Jim at the exit of the submarine. As it opened, he waves crashed into the waterproof room, filling it with salty water. Jack grabbed the safety rope, and, defying the waves, started to make his way, followed by Jim. “God, please help us.” He prayed silently. They got to the life boat just as the mast exit was closing, ‘No turing back now‘ thought Jim. Before he knew what happen, the rope attatching the boats mysteriously snapped, just like that before he had even had a chance to cut it. “this muct be the work of God”, Jim said to Jack.

“Breechwick, this boat won’t go much longer on the waves!” sad Bonher, who was starting to panic “We have to make it, Bonher, we must, for their sakes!” said Breechwick, looking in the direction of the nearly-sunken ship. One of the oars broke “There, I am hopeless! I left a message in my locker entitled to Mary Bonher, hopefully my wife will get it someday!” said Jim “what about you Breechwick, have you left a not for your fiancé?” but Jack didn’t here, he was too busy making an effort to row with one oar.

Suddenly, Jack was thrown out of the boat “Breechwick! BREECHWICK!!! NO!!!!!!!!!” cried Jim  “What have I done?! If I had just helped him oar, oh!” one of the few life boats were rowing past “Sir, may we have your boat? You can step on ours” asked the overseer of the boat “Yes” said Jim hopelessly “Daddy!” said a little girl on the boat “Elizabeth!” said Jim “were are you mother and brothers?!” “Daddy- I don’t know were mother is, but James and Fredrick are on another lifeboat” said the little girl.

“I can help her! I have to help her!”

Jack was under the water.

Where am I? He thought Water! What am I doing under water?! Jack’s mind was in a swirl, he couldn’t think. Ouch! What was that? Something hard, oh no, blood, oh, why did this have to happen! Jack was going dizzy. He grabbed onto the thing that had hurt his head. Great, a rock, what better to stand on? Climbing up onto it, he started calling for help in a very sullen, rough voice. All memory had gone from his mind, he couldn’t think. What he managed to muster into his head was that there was a storm – it must have calmed down because there was only small waves now, there was a boat – a big boat – a ship.

“I have to go and find your mother, Elizabeth, were is she?” asked Jim once he had got on board, “I don’t know, Papa, but I think she is safe enough as she got on a life boat before me,” Elizabeth answered “as Mamma couldn’t find me, so she thought I was dead. But I saw her on being lowered in a boat and she saw me so I guess she got away.”

“Captain, sir, we really have to do something about that boat. I can’t bear to watch it sink and probably hundreds of helpless people being killed.” said Thomas Walters, “Well, then Tom, don’t watch the boat sinkin’ then” yelled the captain “Captain, we have to do something! I won’t sleep in peace for the rest of my life!” said Tom “Walters, we’re not goin’ to help that blasted boat! What ship is it anyway?” asked the captain, trying to open a barrel of beer. “I think it was something like the St Helens or St Anne or something saint,” said Michael  Castle-White, one of the crew known as Bobbins, coming to beg for mercy to save at least some PEOPLE. “Sir, please can we at least try and save some people?” asked Bobbins “What fer? Their just useless people, probably poor, mos’ off ’em good for nothin’!”

The life boat carrying  Mrs. Bonher, as well as James and Fredrick Bonher, smashed across the rocks in vicious wave. “Mother! Save me!” yelled nine-year-old James, who was being washed away with most of the other people in the boat. Mrs. Bonher had knocked her head and was unconscious. “I’ll save you, Jimmy!” said seven-year-old Freddie Bonher, leaping into the water like a playsome frog, like it was all just a game

Jack had collapsed upon the rocks a few seconds after he saw the ship. “There’s another ‘un, love!” said a Scottish women in a life boat, looked toward her husband, “Well’n, bring ‘im up!” replied the husband. Jack was pulled up by two you lads about the ages of 15 and 17, and thrown into the boat. A number of women and young children instantly gathered around him, as the only men to be seen were the lads of about 15 and 17, and the Scottish oarer. “Jack!” said a girl, who appeared to be in her early twenties. Without hesitation she grabbed the bucket used to throw water out the boat, filled it with salty sea water, and…. well…. he was more wet than he had been the minute before. “Jack!” said the girl again. Jack jumped, and started shivering. “Jack, it’s me, Roberta White, your cousin!” “There’s another ‘un, love!” called the Scottish lady again, and again the lads of about 15 anf 17 pulled another person up. It was a boy this time. “Sonny! What are you doin’ in the sea on a night like this! Fishin’?” said the Scottish oarer, “I’m Fredrick George Bonher, the son of Jim and Henrietta Bonher, my mother is from one of the richest family’s in the known world!” said Freddie Bonher, stepping up to his full height, “And no sir, I was not fishing, not fishing for fish anyway. I was looked for my brother, James Peter Bonher, the oldest son of-” “We get it, sonny, now settle down and keep warm. We’ll find your long-lost prodigal brother!”

Continued in Part 3

*Slatt is slang for talking to yourself

 
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Posted by on July 24, 2010 in Action, Adventure, History, Life

 

A Soldiers Prayer

I bled for you – would you for me?

I blessed a skin in blazing fuel
Then took a bullet in a duel of
‘He or I to Die.’

I often question ‘Why? ’
Do you?

My country was my life to give –
Would you for country cease to live?
Sinking in a mire of death,
You have no choice –
So while you’re still alive,
Rejoice!

I cried in failure – did you care?
And as I waned, were you aware of
What I did?
Fighting for my country while you hid
Behind your comfort back at home?

Still relaxed?
My wife and children are fading at the tomb.

 
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Posted by on July 7, 2010 in Action, History, Life, Poems, War

 

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